birdandmoon.com

Nature comics and outdoor adventures.
My Amazing Things poster is now on sale as a print in my TopatoCo shop. It’s an illustration from one of the endings to Ryan North’s choose-your-path Hamlet book, so you can grab it in book form, too.

My Amazing Things poster is now on sale as a print in my TopatoCo shop. It’s an illustration from one of the endings to Ryan North’s choose-your-path Hamlet book, so you can grab it in book form, too.

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

northeastnature:

It’s easy to identify an ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) because no other northeastern damselfly has all-black wings. This is a male, and he’s guarding a territory and looking for mates. If a female comes by, she’ll signal her opinion of him using her wings: spread wings mean “Nope” and a wing flip means “Hey, hot stuff”.

Just a reminder that I’ve got a nature blog! It’s all photos that I’ve taken in the field, along with a little bit of natural history.

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.
If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!

Are you a creature of discerning taste but perhaps alarming instincts? This guide is for you!

(Critters: queen snake, vampire squid, Egyptian vulture, and honeypot ant.)

Original link | Patreon

Hey nature nerds, sorry for the non-nature-photo post! I’ve started a Patreon page for my nature comics. Now you can support birdandmoon.com with small donations and get some neat sciency rewards. Pass it around, and thank you so much for all your help and support. http://www.patreon.com/birdandmoon

I promise that the Patreon spam will stop soon! Yesterday I broke $50 per monthly / bimonthly comic, which is very cool. Thank you SO much, y’all :)

(via northeastnature)

Hey folks! This is the first of a couple of messages I’ll post about my new BirdAndMoon.com Patreon page. It’s a way for you to support my work with small recurring donations, and I’m offering some neat rewards, too.

Thanks as always for following my work :)

A year or two ago I made a comic about David Attenborough, who’s been such an inspiration to so many of us naturalists.

My friend Kiley is one such naturalist. He’s an amazingly knowledgeable and dedicated herpetologist (someone who studies reptiles and amphibians) and an all-around great person. I met him about five years ago. He took me under his herp-wings (marginal scutes?) and taught me a ton about wildlife.

These days we live far away from each other, so we call and sometimes send presents. Yesterday I got a poster tube in the mail. It had a note on it, which you can read in the second picture. In the third picture, you’ll see what was inside the tube. It made my day month year.

Kiley has worked with the Orianne Society, an amazing organization named after a young girl who begged her dad to help save snakes. Seriously. If you love animals, check ‘em out.

Here’s a comic for my infinitely patient birder friends. Original is on my site here.

Happy (belated) World Turtle Day! Here’s a comic I made a few years ago after a herpetology class. It’s the season for turtles crossing the road for amorous and familial reasons. Here’s what to do if you find one. Key points: don’t grab them by the tail, don’t turn them back from whence they came, exercise caution with snappers, and resist the urge to scritch them under their adorable little turtly chins. (Ok, that last one is mine.)